Why “Piercing the Eggshell”?

Some may wonder why the title of the new biography of Bruno & Louise Huber is Piercing the Eggshell. This post – written by my husband and co-author of the book – gives a brief explanation.

As outlined in the book, astrological psychology is very much based on the view of the human psyche adopted by Roberto Assagioli’s psychosynthesis – encapsulated in his ‘Egg’ model. The psychological ego lies within the dotted egg, in its conscious and unconscious guises. The transpersonal (spiritual or higher) self lies at the top and just outside the egg itself. The boundary of the egg is dotted, to illustrate the permeable nature of this relationship, i.e. that this higher self can be connected with.

It is easy to see that the stronger the ego becomes, the more materialistic the person becomes, the less she is open to the higher self, the less permeable is the shell of the egg. In the extreme case the habitual ego is effectively encased within a hard shell. The possibility of higher connection has all but disappeared. It is not difficult to identify individuals in the world where this is apparently the case. Their name is legion.

For most of us the shell is permeable, but the layer of habit is quite strong. Some effort and perseverance is required to connect to our higher faculties. This is where astrological psychology can help.

In the book Astrological Psychosynthesis, Bruno Huber extended the Egg Model into his own Amphora model, a version of which is shown on the cover of Piercing the Eggshell, incorporating the Egg on which it is based.

The Amphora relates the Egg to astrology, and shows a way upward towards our spiritual nature. The ego lies, as before, within the Egg, reflected by the ego planets [Sun, Moon, Saturn] supported by the tool planets [Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter]. The Egg has been opened out at the top, showing Uranus as the planet which helps ‘break through’ the shell of the ego, Neptune as the universal love at the ‘neck’ of the Amphora, through which we must pass before the transformation with Pluto.

So that’s it – an astrological path to growth of the individual ego towards becoming a better version of themselves. The gift of Bruno & Louise Huber.

And that’s why the title is Piercing the Eggshell.

Trump’s Wall

I’ve been watching a very good 2-parter on BBC about the borderland between the US and Mexico, and most specifically the wall which Trump thought was so important to be built, he even said he wanted Mexico to pay for it.

The presenter – Sue Perkins – is a likeable, friendly person who has a knack of getting close in to the people she meets on her trip, and her genuine warmth and interest come across as she explores the real life experience of what it’s like living with the wall, not just for the Mexicans, but the Americans too.

In Mexico, she meets with families, dances in the streets in the festival of the dead, helps prepare food for migrants wanting to cross the border into the US, and spends time with a family who are separated by the wall and can only touch the fingers of their loved ones on the other side through a metal mesh.

Hers is a moving and interesting account seen from both sides of the ugly rusty-brown metal wall and fencing along the boderlands, and it resonated strongly with me as I’ve been to some of the border towns on the US side, crossed (legally) over the Rio Grande to Mexico in a small rowing boat, and have worked as a volunteer in my granddaughter’s Houston school, helping Mexican children – amongst many other ethnicities – with reading and language skills.

Seeing more of Mexican life through the eyes of Sue Perkins, I was struck by how happy and sunny the Mexicans are, often in the face of hardship and emotional challenges. They seemed to want the very best for their children, the family unit was of great importance and in true Latino way, they had music and fire in their souls.

Although drug smuggling across the border was explored, with the help of a Texan sherrif in a Stetson, and with a gun at his hip, the series transcended the tales of drug cartels and focussed of many other aspects of Mexican life. It was fascinating and reminded me of the friendliness and warmth I’d experienced on my day trip to the small villages of Boquillas last year.

Part of Perkin’s journey on the US side covered a section of Big Bend National Park, which is right against the border, which is defined by the Rio Grande (see picture above). She went canoeing along it, down what looked like the Santa Elena canyon; we walked by it last year and it is definitely spectacular. In Big Bend, the mountains provide a natural wall, one which doesn’t prevent the free movement of the wildlife which live in this dramatic desert region.

I was struck by how much happier and sunnier the Mexicans she met were compared to the Americans, some of whom seemed quite dour and focussed on protecting themslves and their land. Now I don’t know if that was a deliberate ploy in the production and editing of the programme, but I do know from experience of road trips in this part of Texas that the people working a living on the land are tough, the womenfolk too, and that guns are a part of everydaylife. The exection to this on the trip was when she visited the town of Marfa. More on this next time, as it’s somewhere I’ve been to where there are mysterious lights to be seen…..

 

Black History Month

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This terrifying sculpture is in Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama. Its power lies in the fact that the path passes between these raging dogs, and by walking along it you have to pass between these ferocious but inanimate canines.

Now just imagine they are real.

I’m reblogging the post I wrote about my visit to Birmingham at the start of Black History Month, which starts today – 1st October – and continues to the end of the month. No doubt there will be many references to Black Lives Matter and to the significant figures in the struggle for Black rights in the USA. But this issue goes further afield than the US; it’s everywhere.

My visit to the Deep South and some of the places where Civil Rights demostrations took place has had a lasting effect on me. To walk the historic walk that Martin Luther King and other Civil Rights leaders took was a sobering and powerful experience. Visiting the Civil Rights Museum there and seeing footage of what took place hit home. One of the most moving street exhibits on the walk was the one about singing and how music and singing together was a source of strength. As a choir member I know just how powerful that can be.P1050175Here’s what I wrote in my original post in 2018:

On May 2nd, 1963, more than 1,000 African American teenagers assembled at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church across the road, and prepared to march to Birmingham’s City Hall in support of the civil rights movement. The following day, “Bull” Connor, Commissioner for Public Safety, ordered police, dog handlers and firemen to the park.

When the protestors entered the park and refused to leave, water cannons were turned on them, knocking them to the ground. German shepherd dogs were directed towards the crowd, their handlers commanding them to attack. This, and the police brutality towards these teenage protesters, shocked America and the world.

This is only one part of the struggle for civil rights which went on in Alabama, led by Dr. Martin Luther King. My recent visit to this, and other sites associated with the civil rights (and let’s face it, human rights) movement, was an eye opening window on to history which was made in my lifetime.

But I’ve no illusions. The struggle against inequality goes on. Some things may have improved, but there’s a whole lot more room still available for improvement.

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Living with the new normal

TX long roadListening to a recent radio interview with Dr. David Nabbaro of the WHO, I was impressed and reassured by his honesty and no-nonsense plain speaking when questioned about Covid-19 and where we are right now with this pandemic. I quote some of his words as they convey the reality of what we, collectively, have to do to help bring the spread of this virus under control and eliminate it:

“This virus is not going away and is really dangerous. This virus doesn’t get bored. This virus only has one purpose and that is to multiply. We have absolutely no choice but to take it seriously. We’ve got to have everybody working together, and we need a comprehensive approach, we’ve got to do everything….”

here he mentioned wearing masks, keeping socially distant, using  testing/tracing, and remaining vigilant at all times

“….over time, this will become the norm. We don’t have an alternative. This virus isn’t going away for the foreseeable future – we’ve all got to learn to live with it.”

His clarity, laying on the line what we collectively have to do, no matter which country we live in, had my thoughts turning to the astrological psychology I’m trained in and have used to counsel numerous clients over the years. Please come with me as I leap from our global pandemic to the qualities, energies and expressions of the planet Saturn, and what it means in terms of observable human behaviour and where we are right now.

I’m sharing an edited extract from a talk I gave at a UK national astrological conference some years ago. It offers a practical exploration of the meaning and manifestations of the planet Saturn in everyday life. You do not need to have any prior knowledge of astrology, or of what the planet Saturn represents; I hope I can enlighten you a little on this and give you some food for thought which might help a little as we steer our way through this virus-laden mess.

Millstone or Mentor? (that was the title of my talk)

Do you check the weather forecast before you leave home to see if you’ll need an umbrella, check the train timetable on your phone when going to the station, and maybe make sure you have a map in the car when setting off on a journey to a new destination, even though you’ve programmed the satnav? If you answered “yes” to any of these, then you were probably drawing on your own resources of Saturnian energy.

Structure and organisation

In astrology, the drive associated with Saturn is for Security. Saturn is concerned with structure and form, always seeking to organise, preserve and maintain things within manageable limits. In our solar system, Saturn is the furthest planet that can be seen by the naked eye.  Before the outer planets were discovered, following the invention of the telescope, Saturn’s position marked the outermost limit of our knowledge of the solar system, so it is not altogether surprising that astrologically it symbolises limitation, boundaries and our own security drives. It is the planet that swings into action when we need to know just exactly where we stand, so having social structures, guidelines and rules to abide by are all part of Saturn’s realm. Saturn gives the physical sense of self which we gain through the body. The structure, organisation and limitation associated with Saturn are present in the various systems in the body – the respiratory system, the circulatory system, and the digestive system, to mention just a few. The skeletal system provides a firm, solid physical structure around which the other systems are organised. As all these systems are interdependent, their clear-cut organisation is vital. The skin – our own boundary which marks our physical outermost limits – contains them all.

Saturn helps us to become responsible and reliable as individuals; if we live within the rules and guidelines of society then we reap the benefits of feeling safe and secure. Saturn is the perfect foil to  unfettered over-expansiveness and behaviour which can get out of hand. If not contained, our excesses can take us beyond the limits of acceptability. Saturn helps in curbing what might become outrageous and antisocial behaviour by giving us a sense of caution and responsibility. Taken to extremes, this sense of caution can become fear,  holding us back and restricting us in everyday life, so it’s important with Saturn that we get the balance right, and that we don’t allow our fears to hold us back from doing what is important for us. Because it symbolises such qualities as  responsibility and caution Saturn may not sound like much fun, so it’s important that we understand its positive attributes. It’s value should not be underestimated as it plays an essential role in our psychological make up. Like all the planetary qualities and energies, it can operate at different levels of consciousness, sometimes dormant and inert and responding in a habitual manner, but at its highest level Saturn will endow us with the ability to act with dignity and maturity. Then we can live with a clear conscience, accessing the deep learning of life we have developed, and become a mentor and benefactor  to those who seek our help, support or advice.

 What we know about Saturn astronomically – that it has rings which form a boundary around it – reflects the astrological meaning of the planet. Its protective rings are akin to the qualities of limitation and boundaries which are astrologically associated  with Saturn. Psychologically, Saturn can be like a millstone. It can represent those things in life which are really heavy & which drag us down, so has the effect of being the “killjoy of the cosmos”,  but it can also be like a wise mentor, guiding, teaching and advising with our best interests and safety at heart.

At the moment there are a lot of people getting fed up with the restraints we’re living under to help curb the growth and spread of Covid-19, so it’s easy to understand how these limits might feel like a heavy millstone, a drag on what we’re used to being free to do. This might make us rebel against the Saturnian harshness of where we are now, yet our lives would almost certainly be a chaotic mess without Saturnian qualities around to provide the structure and practical grounding of living in the material world, especially now our current world and lifestyles and jobs  are under threat.

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Masks

Masks have probably always provoked strong reactions because they hide, conceal and mystify. I’m thinking here of masked balls, the elaborate masks worn at the Carnival of Venice, the Guy Fawkes masks worn by protesters, and the masked faces of highwaymen in times gone by.

Dressing up 3 FroebelI created quite a stir many years ago when, at a fancy dress celebratory party at the end of an astrological psychology workshop. I went dressed as my interpretation of the planet Uranus and wore a full face mask. It wasn’t the costume that disturbed and intrigued people, it was the mask. People who knew me well didn’t recognise me and kept asking/guessing who I was. In astrological terms, Uranus is the planetary energy associated with change, upheaval, revolution, “ah-ha” moments, scientific knowledge and advance, and technology. Very relevant for the times we’re living in, and something I wrote about a while back. See here.

Who would have thought, back in March 2020, that masks would have become such a touchy, high profile subject. They’re a political hot potato right now, some people hating them and saying they will not wear them while others just get on with it and put them on, knowing that it’s the very least they can do to help bring this virus under control. I fall into the latter category.

The British government continue with their lack of clear messages to the public and the wearing of masks is a case in point. Announcing that from 24th July everyone is required to wear masks in shops, there still seem to be some cabinet ministers who don’t quite get this. Not especially surprising as a 10 day gap has been allowed between the date of the announcement and 24th July. Wondering why? Me too. Why not just a couple of days to allow people time to get themselves mask-organised? Why the delay?

Way ahead of this many people, myself included, wouldn’t – and still won’t for some time to come – go inside anywhere without a mask since the science says airborne particles of virus in breath droplets stand a far better chance of finding somewhere to adhere to in an enclosed space. It makes sense to wear a mask to protect yourself for this reason as well as to protect others if you are an asymptomatic carrier and don’t know if you’ve had the virus, or if you carry the virus.

It’s all down to being responsible to ourselves and to each other. OK, so people do look a bit strange wearing them, but we’ll get used to it. I’m fascinated by how they remind me of nose bags worn by horses and have a giggle at the thought of what could be munched behind them as people walk along.

As we’re not going to be able to show our facial expressions so well, we might be able to get away with poking out tongues at people we don’t like and getting away with it (no I’m not seriously suggesting that, it’s just a naughty bit of me coming out there). We’ll have to learn how to use our eyes more – smile with them and let the corners crinkle up a bit. We may need plenty of smiles to help us get through this.

Way back in March, when we were still in Houston visiting our family and realised we had to get a flight back home fast as the airlines were closing down, we tried out the masks we had with us ahead of leaving for the airport. If we look a bit terrified in picture 1 it’s because were were and we didn’t know what we were getting in to.

A few months down the line in picture 2 we put them on to go through the visitor centre and into the open air Wetlands Centre at Martin Mere. Not so much fear here about wearing them, just common sense and acceptance of the reality of our lifestyle and how the the world is now, as a vaccine is sought.

This is no time for anyone to drop their guard and relax. So please wear the damn things and do your bit.