A COVID Christmas message

The risk of catching Covid-19 from another family member is high, as much as you love them, so please read and take heed of this important message.

Robby Robin's Journey

This is an unusual Christmas post, but then again this is Christmas in a year like no other. This season is a time that’s meant to bring joy, and this year we have to be especially creative in finding ways to do so while keeping everyone safe. I wish everyone a happy holiday; this COVID world is at least offering us the time to look for joy in the small things, if we only choose to take it. Let’s take advantage of that.

I think this blog post from fellow blogger Kavitha at Sunshiny SA Site is important to reblog in its entirety. It is a strong reminder of why the restrictions in place in so many of our regions are there for a reason. The story it shares has been replicated far too many times: in Canada, South Africa, the United States, the UK, EU countries, and everywhere around…

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The techie problem

I totally agree – it’s a WordPress mess – and I shall be coming back to this topic as I have my own thoughts and experience of the new block editor, as does my dog! (see Barry’s link to this)

I can't believe it!

I was a techie once, helping to produce mainframe software – probably still am in many ways. Techies understand the intricate workings of the modern world, the technology, the apps, the website mechanics… The job of techies is to produce products that help life in the real world, that society increasingly relies upon. Even WordPress is evidently powered by techies.

The problem with techies, particularly the cleverest of them, is arrogance. I remember many of them. They know their field better than almost anyone else, and do not suffer fools gladly. They know they are right. Even when they are wrong.

And that’s the problem. Their expertise is technical, and does not necessarily relate well to real life. The early software systems learnt the hard way that so-called usability is of vital importance, and that includes carrying your customers forward with you as you develop the technology. Woe betide a…

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Why make blogging more difficult?

As someone who has had the new WordPress Block Editor foisted upon her, this says it all, and more. WordPress – bring back the option of the Classic Editor. Some of us (many!) don’t like this new techie style, we don’t have the time or the inclination to go through a whole new learning curve which we didn’t ask for, so please

BRING BACK THE CLASSIC EDITOR

And thank you if any of you WordPress bigwigs & techies are reading this. Please – just do it.

I can't believe it!

Some time ago WordPress introduced the block editor, giving much greater functionality than the old classic editor. This probably seemed a great idea to the geeks at WordPress HQ.

The problem is: it’s far harder to use than the classic editor, which is much like any old editor of the past couple of decades. Or at least it wasn’t a problem until they made the block editor the default, so you have to rummage around to find the classic editor, hidden away in the detail.

This makes blogging harder; why do that?

Now I have to admit to having used the block editor on web pages, when it gives some very nifty features to simply achieve complex things. But for my blog posts the classic editor is quite sufficient. You could almost make a general rule – classic editor for blog posts and simple pages, block editor for doing clever…

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Buff tailed bumble bee

It’s good to see there are bees in the garden. There are plenty of nectar sources; among these are the pale pink blossoms on the blackberry vine which wends its way along the wall under the kitchen window. Already the petals are dropping as the fruits begin to form.

Bees go for purple flowers and we have quite a lot of these. The lavender, which they are strongly attracted to, is just coming into flower.

As a child I was scared to pass lavender bushes smothered in bees. Now I’ll happily lose time watching the bees at work on them, trying to ID them – usually not doing particularly well so I have to go indoors to refer to the bee chart we have on the wall.

Maybe I need a bee ID book…? (birthday present hint!).

 

There’s life in the old log yet

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This stump of a freshly felled tree in Anderton Nature Park caught my eye when walking there yesterday. It’s quite sad to see the remains of what must have been quite a large tree – maybe it had become diseased, maybe it was getting dangerous. We did hear the branch of a nearby tree creaking loudly and a bit alarmingly in the wind, as though it might have been loosening, ready to break off. We moved on sharpish!

The path took us through a wood full of past-their-best bluebells. Most of them were shrivelling and going to seed, but a few of the fresher and younger ones still looked magnificent. Right now the ground under the trees is carpeted with ramsens in full bloom, looking like soft white feathers.

The tree stump was surrounded by ramsens, and along with the ferns growing there they formed a wreath of green life, an appropriate memorial for a felled tree.